David Cameron has claimed Ed Miliband had been "dying" for a winter A&E crisis that did not happen.

The Prime Minister told the Commons that accident and emergency targets had been met during the winter months, adding "a strong NHS" coped during the period.

Mr Cameron also claimed the Labour leader had been silent on the issue at Prime Minister's Questions since November, despite predicting a crisis.

The PM was challenged to explain what he planned to do about thousands of ambulances waiting in queues outside A&E for at least 30 minutes.

He replied to Labour's Mark Hendrick (Preston) during PMQ's: "What we are doing about it is making sure that the £12.7 billion extra we are putting into the NHS - unlike the Labour NHS cut in Wales - is going to good use and we can actually see in our NHS we have 1.2 million more people attending accident and emergency.

"And over this winter period we met our targets for accident and emergency.

"I remember the last time the Labour leader raised our hospitals at Prime Minister's Questions - it was back in November. He hasn't had a word to say about it since.

"He predicted a winter crisis, he sat there day after day dying for it to happen. It didn't happen because we've got a strong NHS with more doctors, more nurses serving our country."

Mr Hendrick had told the PM: "50,499 ambulances have been waiting in queues for at least half an hour at accident and emergency units up and down the country. What are you going to do about it?"

A senior Labour source said Mr Cameron was "in denial" about the state of the health service.

The source said: "I was quite surprised by the Prime Minister's remarks on the NHS.

"We have an NHS where one million are waiting more than four hours in A&E to be seen, where a quarter of walk-in centres have closed since 2010 and a quarter of patients can't get to see their GPs in 48 hours.

"I would describe that as a Prime Minister being in denial about the direction of the NHS under this Government."