So, how do you take large lorries off Oxfordshire's roads?

Banbury Cake: County councillor David Nimmo Smith County councillor David Nimmo Smith

TRANSPORT chiefs are carrying out a study into how large lorries can be taken off some of Oxfordshire’s roads.

Proposals includes the possibility of a park-and-ride for lorries on the outskirts of Oxford city centre and Abingdon.

Oxfordshire County Council is carrying out the study following concerns from people worried about the number of HGVs using smaller roads.

County councillor David Nimmo Smith, the cabinet member for transport, said: “We are getting concerns from a lot of the towns and parishes about the number of lorries which really should be sticking to the trunk roads.

“Within that there is also a consideration of how to deal with lorries in the city.

“A lot of it is through traffic which really has no reason to use smaller roads and we are getting concerns from Chipping Norton, Burford, Bloxham and Henley.

“Anything which reduces that and reduces the air pollution they generate has got to be encouraged.”

Mr Nimmo Smith said the study is expected to be completed in the summer and said it was too early to say what might be proposed as a result of it.

But he said the use of freight “park and rides” was an example of what could be done, not just outside Oxford but also towns like Abingdon.

Geoff Mollard, the chairman of Bloxham parish council, said: “It causes enormous traffic problems.

“The centre of the village where the shopping area is gets completely bunged up by HGVs coming through here.

“What with that and the weight, the noise and the pollution the heavy traffic should not really be coming here. The roads weren’t built for it.”

Oxford City Council has ambitions to create a freight “consolidation centre” outside the city which would act as a park-and-ride for lorries, where they can deposit their goods without entering Oxford.

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City councillor John Tanner, executive board member for cleaner, greener Oxford, said: “The city and county council are working on the possibility of a freight consolidation centre.

“What this would mean is that the supermarkets and other firms which use large lorries would deposit their loads at a lorry park-and-ride outside Oxford and this would be shipped into the city with smaller vehicles, possibly electric ones.”

But Rhys Williams, area manager for Oxfordshire Road Haulage Association, said a consolidation centre could mean more vehicles on Oxford’s roads, some of which might not meet the stringent environmental tests HGVs have to pass.

He said: “Hauliers don’t like going into villages just as much as the villages don’t like trucks going in them.

“Drivers don’t want to be negotiating a 40-tonne lorry through somewhere like Watlington.”

Comments (7)

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7:11am Thu 24 Apr 14

Andrew:Oxford says...

Freight consolidation centre?

Would it not be easier just to build a large out-of-town shopping centre...
Freight consolidation centre? Would it not be easier just to build a large out-of-town shopping centre... Andrew:Oxford
  • Score: 4

8:00am Thu 24 Apr 14

Dilligaf2010 says...

But Rhys Williams, area manager for Oxfordshire Road Haulage Association, said a consolidation centre could mean more vehicles on Oxford’s roads, some of which might not meet the stringent environmental tests HGVs have to pass........
...........Surely the only additional vehicles would be the electric ones...
But Rhys Williams, area manager for Oxfordshire Road Haulage Association, said a consolidation centre could mean more vehicles on Oxford’s roads, some of which might not meet the stringent environmental tests HGVs have to pass........ ...........Surely the only additional vehicles would be the electric ones... Dilligaf2010
  • Score: -2

9:44am Thu 24 Apr 14

Gunslinger says...

Dilligaf2010 wrote:
But Rhys Williams, area manager for Oxfordshire Road Haulage Association, said a consolidation centre could mean more vehicles on Oxford’s roads, some of which might not meet the stringent environmental tests HGVs have to pass........
...........Surely the only additional vehicles would be the electric ones...
Not necessarily.

The distributors might themselves switch to smaller vehicles to avoid having to use the central facility, which would presumably not be under their control, and impose additional costs.

So if their distribution centre is in say Swindon or Reading, there might actually be more HGV movements, and traffic, between those points and the centres of Oxford, Abingdon etc.

To impose delivery restrictions in Oxford which did not apply in competing towns would be commercial suicide for the city.
[quote][p][bold]Dilligaf2010[/bold] wrote: But Rhys Williams, area manager for Oxfordshire Road Haulage Association, said a consolidation centre could mean more vehicles on Oxford’s roads, some of which might not meet the stringent environmental tests HGVs have to pass........ ...........Surely the only additional vehicles would be the electric ones...[/p][/quote]Not necessarily. The distributors might themselves switch to smaller vehicles to avoid having to use the central facility, which would presumably not be under their control, and impose additional costs. So if their distribution centre is in say Swindon or Reading, there might actually be more HGV movements, and traffic, between those points and the centres of Oxford, Abingdon etc. To impose delivery restrictions in Oxford which did not apply in competing towns would be commercial suicide for the city. Gunslinger
  • Score: 5

11:29am Thu 24 Apr 14

Quentin Walker says...

Oxford doesn't welcome cars, what chance anything larger? Economic suicide. It's time the Council moved into the 21st century.
Oxford doesn't welcome cars, what chance anything larger? Economic suicide. It's time the Council moved into the 21st century. Quentin Walker
  • Score: 5

12:26pm Thu 24 Apr 14

Cityview says...

Quote:“Drivers don’t want to be negotiating a 40-tonne lorry through somewhere like Watlington.”

One hopes not as there is a weight restriction in place to stop rat running from the M40. Unless the 40 tonne lorry is delivering locally of course.
Quote:“Drivers don’t want to be negotiating a 40-tonne lorry through somewhere like Watlington.” One hopes not as there is a weight restriction in place to stop rat running from the M40. Unless the 40 tonne lorry is delivering locally of course. Cityview
  • Score: 2

2:49pm Thu 24 Apr 14

King Joke says...

Pathetic. Like it or not the standard of living we enjoy simply wouldn't be possible without the cheap mobility of goods the lorry has given us. THere are already restrictions in place to ensure places like Watlington aren't overly affected by heavy lorries. Other roads like the A40, A34, A420 are well capable of handling them, and we should leave then alone to do their job.
Pathetic. Like it or not the standard of living we enjoy simply wouldn't be possible without the cheap mobility of goods the lorry has given us. THere are already restrictions in place to ensure places like Watlington aren't overly affected by heavy lorries. Other roads like the A40, A34, A420 are well capable of handling them, and we should leave then alone to do their job. King Joke
  • Score: 1

11:07pm Thu 24 Apr 14

the wizard says...

How about County councillor David Nimmo Smith and the John Tanner person stepping out of their wonder world and taking some steps into reality. Larger stores like Supermarkets and the likes of M+S have truck loads dedicated to one store . Can you just imagine how many smaller trucks it would take to decant a larger artic full of chilled food , when many of the artics are double deckers within. A few days spent in a distribution hub by our council officials would be time well spent to see the effort that goes into todays distribution to the High St.

Surely the way forward is to talk to companies and work out more night time deliveries to take trucks out of the day time scenario, and to put some decent roads in place of the tracks we have here in Oxfordshire, probably the worse road network in the country which has been neglected by various administrations for the last 50 years. It really is time Oxfordshire got its head around the needs of todays society, and the sooner they realize Oxford is not the glorious place they would like to think it is the better. Take the Uni buildings out of Oxford and you are left with something that resembles an old toilet. Its dirty, disgusting, unkept and in need of some decent upgrading, wake up Tanner, the world has passed you by, and as goes the centre of Abingdon, it is in urgent need of a bull dozer and a fresh start, and a fresh council with modern ideas to pull it into the 21st century, as opposed to the duffers and ditherers of the last 40 years.
How about County councillor David Nimmo Smith and the John Tanner person stepping out of their wonder world and taking some steps into reality. Larger stores like Supermarkets and the likes of M+S have truck loads dedicated to one store . Can you just imagine how many smaller trucks it would take to decant a larger artic full of chilled food , when many of the artics are double deckers within. A few days spent in a distribution hub by our council officials would be time well spent to see the effort that goes into todays distribution to the High St. Surely the way forward is to talk to companies and work out more night time deliveries to take trucks out of the day time scenario, and to put some decent roads in place of the tracks we have here in Oxfordshire, probably the worse road network in the country which has been neglected by various administrations for the last 50 years. It really is time Oxfordshire got its head around the needs of todays society, and the sooner they realize Oxford is not the glorious place they would like to think it is the better. Take the Uni buildings out of Oxford and you are left with something that resembles an old toilet. Its dirty, disgusting, unkept and in need of some decent upgrading, wake up Tanner, the world has passed you by, and as goes the centre of Abingdon, it is in urgent need of a bull dozer and a fresh start, and a fresh council with modern ideas to pull it into the 21st century, as opposed to the duffers and ditherers of the last 40 years. the wizard
  • Score: 2

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